The Half-Century: I MADE VERY LITTLE PROGRESS

It is said that famous men are usually the product of unhappy childhood. The stern compression of circumstances, the twinges of adversity, the spur of slights and taunts in early years, are needed to evoke that ruthless fixity of purpose and tenacious motherwit without which great actions are seldom accomplished.

¬óWinston Churchill, describing the childhood of his great ancestor, John, Duke of Marlborough

Modern psychologists and pedagogues would call Winston Churchill's childhood far from ideal. His early picture of his mother: "In a riding habit, fitting like a skin and often beautifully spotted with...

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