More Than Hot Air

Six decades after the Hindenburg disaster, giant Zeppelins could soon become commercially viable once again

Just once, Scott Danneker would like to see a TV documentary or magazine story about his employer that doesn't feature the airship Hindenburg's bursting like a lava-filled egg over Lakehurst, N.J., on May 6, 1937. "What would happen if people felt compelled to mention Pan Am Flight 103 every time they talked about airplanes?" he asks. Danneker would rather talk about sleek, soaring dirigibles like the Norge, which in 1926 pinpointed the exact position of the North Pole for the first time, or about the millions of kilometers of uneventful flight the Hindenburg racked up before its dramatic exit.

A self-proclaimed...

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