Order In The Court

The Senate agrees on how to try Clinton but what happens when the really tough votes come?

The founders didn't invent the separation of powers, but they were the first to put it into practice. They were proud of the safety that checks and balances guaranteed and believed that only the most dangerous occasions warranted setting them aside. Last week the Senate unwrapped a constitutional mechanism that no one alive has ever witnessed: the trial of the President, prosecuted by the House, before the Senate, presided over by the Chief Justice, all the branches of government worshipping together for only the second time in history, and the most momentous thing about it was that it seemed to many...

Want the full story?

Subscribe Now

Subscribe
Subscribe

Get TIME the way you want it

  • One Week Digital Pass — $4.99
  • Monthly Pay-As-You-Go DIGITAL ACCESS$2.99
  • One Year ALL ACCESSJust $30!   Best Deal!
    Print Magazine + Digital Edition + Subscriber-only Content on TIME.com

Learn more about the benefits of being a TIME subscriber

If you are already a subscriber sign up — registration is free!