THE PLANT HUNTER

SEEKING ANSWERS IN ANCIENT RAIN-FOREST REMEDIES IS A LIFE'S WORK FOR

The teacher and student sit cross-legged, facing each other on the floor of the open-sided hut in Western Samoa. Behind them the rain forest rises to the pinnacle of a long-dormant volcano. Beneath the thatched roof, a gaggle of children intently watches the proceedings. The teacher is Salome Isofea, 30, a young healer who is demonstrating her art. The man opposite her, a Westerner named Paul Alan Cox, is no ordinary student. He is a botany professor and dean at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah, a world specialist in medicinal plants and, far from least in this exotic setting, the...

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