SULLIVAN'S TRAVAILS

THE NEW REPUBLIC'S EDITOR ENDS A STORMY TENURE

Openly gay, under 30, British and a Margaret Thatcher conservative, Andrew Sullivan was an unconventional choice to edit the New Republic. Since taking over the neoliberal weekly in October 1991, Sullivan has kept it roiling with controversy, running such cover stories as a 1994 attack on Clinton's health-care plan by Betsy McCaughey (which many credit with turning the political tide against the plan) and a lengthy excerpt from The Bell Curve, the book by Charles Murray and Richard J. Herrnstein, linking IQ with race. Last week, after 4 1/2 years at the helm, Sullivan resigned as editor and found himself at...

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