ZOOMING IN ON DYSLEXIA

CAN VIDEO GAMES TREAT LEARNING DISORDERS? NEW RESEARCH RAISES CAUTIOUS HOPE

AT AGE 5, KEILLAN LECKY DREADED kindergarten. So many of the words her playmates gleefully shouted or conspiratorially whispered seemed to hover just out of reach, as elusive as a vanishing rainbow. Her difficulty understanding them was starting to affect her schoolwork. Then, last summer, Keillan, along with 21 other language-impaired children, was enrolled in an experimental program at Rutgers University in Newark, New Jersey, in which the kids improved their auditory skills by playing computer games. The change in Keillan and the others was so remarkable, says Paula Tallal, co-director of the Center for Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience at Rutgers,...

Want the full story?

Subscribe Now

Subscribe
Subscribe

Get TIME the way you want it

  • One Week Digital Pass — $4.99
  • Monthly Pay-As-You-Go DIGITAL ACCESS$2.99
  • One Year ALL ACCESSJust $30!   Best Deal!
    Print Magazine + Digital Edition + Subscriber-only Content on TIME.com

Learn more about the benefits of being a TIME subscriber

If you are already a subscriber sign up — registration is free!