OF OZONE AND FRUIT FLIES

A GERMAN, A DUTCHMAN AND SEVEN AMERICANS WIN THE SCIENCE PRIZES

TO PERPLEXED LAYMEN, THE CELEbrated Nobel Prizes often seem to point down obscure pathways of science, focusing on narrow, highly specialized research that few nonscientists can understand or appreciate. Not this year. The $1 million 1995 prizes in physics, chemistry, economics, and medicine or physiology, announced in Stockholm last week, went to scientists who have wrestled with questions at once basic and easily grasped: What is the universe made of? How does DNA create complex life-forms? What made the hole in the ozone layer? And how do people decide how they spend and invest their money?

PARTICLE SLEUTHS When Wolfgang Pauli...

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