Making Seconds Count

With Jakarta relaxing its press censorship, a daring newspaper thrives. But has it hit the limit?

AS IT HAS BEEN THROUGHOUT HIS 26 years of rule, when President Suharto talks, Indonesia listens. But in a political system so secretive that even insiders have a hard time figuring out what is being said around the President's office, residents of the archipelago nation are turning to a new source to follow the inner workings of the government. DeTik, an upstart weekly newspaper, is addressing once off-limits political and social issues, pushing the envelope of the permissible. Last week the government reacted with a warning shot that has observers wondering if the paper has perhaps pressed its luck as far...

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