When Hate Makes a Fist

When does a crime become a hate crime? The Supreme Court deals with criminals who add insult to injury.

In October 1989 a group of young black men in the Wisconsin town of Kenosha saw Mississippi Burning, the film about Ku Klux Klan terror in the early 1960s. As they left the theater, one of the blacks, Todd Mitchell, spotted a 14-year-old white youth named Gregory Riddick. "Do you all feel hyped up to move on some white people?" Mitchell allegedly asked. "There goes a white boy. Go get him!"

They did. Mitchell's friends jumped Riddick and beat him so badly that he suffers permanent brain damage. Mitchell was tried and convicted of aggravated battery -- and of something more...

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