America Abroad: How to Keep Divorce from Leading to War

The Kremlin, once the seat and symbol of absolute power, now has the air of a museum, a sprawling, drafty memento mori of the old regime. The long corridors are eerily silent; the guards seem listless. The nameplates on most doors have been removed. Many rooms are not just empty; they seem abandoned. Boris Yeltsin has moved in, but a number of his advisers have stayed behind at the Russian Parliament to massage legislators who are restless -- if not rebellious -- over the price their constituents are paying for reform.

Real politics has come to Russia. Unfortunately, so has an...