Khrushchev's Secret Tapes

Ousted from power in 1964, Nikita Khrushchev became a nonperson, living out his last seven years under virtual house arrest in the village of Petrovo- Dalneye, on the outskirts of Moscow. To keep himself going but also to make sure that his side of the story survived, Khrushchev dictated hundreds of hours of reminiscences. Many of the tapes were smuggled to the West, and Little, Brown published two volumes of memoirs: Khrushchev Remembers in 1970 and Khrushchev Remembers: The Last Testament in 1974.

Khrushchev's relatives and friends feared, however, that the former Kremlin ruler had sometimes gone too far in fulminating...

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