Living: Getting Young and Old Together

A growing number of U.S. programs forge links between the ages at a time when social patterns tend to separate them

Some call them the sandwich generation, that bulging demographic cohort of thirtysomethings and fortysomethings who face an onerous triple duty: caring for young children and elderly parents while holding down full-time jobs. More than one-third of the U.S. work force confronts this problem, a number that is sure to rise as the population continues to age and as more women, the family's traditional care givers, enter the job market. What's a working couple to do with junior and Granny between 9 and 5? Throughout the U.S., a growing number of programs are now aimed at stimulating contact between young and old...

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