A Great Day for Germany

But Moscow's long memory remains the biggest obstacle in the way of unification

If it's not one problem, it's another. After surrendering his party's monopoly , on power last week, Mikhail Gorbachev turned his attention to a separate issue that he and his countrymen find painful: the incipient unification of Germany. On Saturday West German Chancellor Helmut Kohl arrived in Moscow for two hours of talks with the Soviet President. Emerging from their meeting, Kohl declared that Gorbachev had promised to respect a united Germany. Kohl and his Foreign Minister, Hans-Dietrich Genscher, said a plan for unification, in concert with France, Britain, the U.S. and the Soviet Union, would be ready by this year....

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