Uruguay: Free Again

Rejoining the democratic club

Broad-shouldered, bushy-eyebrowed Julio María Sanguinetti, 48, bounded to the platform in the cavernous assembly hall of Montevideo's Colorado Party headquarters and gave a cheering crowd of election-night supporters the good news. "The verdict of the polls indicates we are the majority," he said. "We will not be an arrogant majority. We will have republican humility." With that pledge, President-elect Sanguinetti marked Uruguay's return to civilian government after eleven years of military rule.

Uruguay thus became the latest country in Latin America to replace dictatorship with democracy over the past few years. Others include Argentina, Bolivia, Ecuador, El...

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