Environment: To Save the Seas

After rising steadily for 25 years, the world fish catch dropped 2% last year, the first decrease in 25 years. The loss represented $160 million. Worse, it suggested that ocean harvesting—one of the great hopes for curbing world hunger—may be endangered by ocean pollution.

In Rome last week, the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization tackled the problem by inviting 400 scientists from 40 maritime nations to discuss man's abuse of the seas. The biggest and most important such conference to date produced more than 140 papers describing the danger. For example, two French scientists, Georges Bellan and Jean-Marie Peres, expressed alarm...

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