Letters, Feb. 22, 1960

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Guns Cocked or Dozing?

Sir:

Your story "The Coming Missile Gap" is the most concise, comprehensive, fair and frank statement of the terrific problem of defense that we currently face that I have seen. You cut through all the confusing conflict of recent testimony in a way that performs a real public service.

SAMUEL S. STRATTON Committee on Armed Services House of Representatives Washington

SIR: TIME MISSILE GAP FACTS [FEB.1] INDICATE MILLIONS OF AMERICAN LIVES MAY WELL REST ON POLITICAL-FINANCIAL DECISIONS. WE SHOULD KEEP OUR GUNS COCKED ON THE UN PREDICTABL RUSSIAN BEAR. DOZING OFF MEANS FINISH.

L. B. COYLE SAN DIEGO

Sir: Now that we have a missile "gap," may we presume that the nation will resort to stopgap measures?

ANTHONY L. PALAZZOLO Lieutenant Commander, USN Newport News, Va.

Unwise to Lump

Sir:

I would like to comment briefly on the review of my book, The Future of Public Education [Feb. 1]. The book specifically states (contrary to the interpretation in the review) that it has been unwise to lump all teachers together, regardless of grade level or subject taught, into one vast organization.

It is not my reckoning that "U.S. schools will improve only when the teachers take charge." Teachers have the major responsibility for improving education, but saying that education will improve only if teachers "take charge" goes beyond what I meant, if not what I wrote.

Finally, I don't believe that educational policy — without any qualification whatsoever — can or should be the sole prerogative of the teachers. Educational organizations have been ineffective in developing broad educational policy. They should not be a law unto themselves in this regard. Right now the problem is not whether they can dominate educational policy but whether they can influence it at all on important points.

Having unburdened, myself, may I also express my deep appreciation for the review, and the hope that it will help focus attention on some neglected but important problems of education.

MYRON LIEBERMAN Cleveland

Big Joke

Sir:

My line [Feb. 8] about feeling as Edison would have if they had rejected the electric light was a joke,Son, and not a whimper. TIME also erred in stating that NBC felt I was not the proper moderator for "Meeting of Minds." NBC offered me 30 minutes elsewhere in the week to broadcast the segment. I rejected the offer.

STEVE ALLEN

Hollywood

¶TIME never had such a laugh, Son.

—ED.

Ballot Box

Sir:

Your cover story on Hubert Humphrey [Feb. 1]proves that, if you want to be, you are capable of being fair-minded even where liberals are concerned. If you keep it up, you may woo quite a few of us, who quit you long ago, back into the fold.

WILLIAM H. FISHER

Las Vegas, N. Mex.

Sir:

Humphrey is obviously the thinking man's candidate, but unfortunately not the voting man's choice.

JOCK McFARLANE

Brown University Providence

Sir:

Certainly Senator Humphrey talks a lot. He has something to talk about. He is the best-informed man in Government today.

RAY CHISHOLM

Minneapolis

Sir:

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