Education: Learning to Fix It or Fly It

Embry-Riddle: the Harvard of the sky

At busy airports, the blue and white coveralls of the nation's 130,000 aircraft mechanics used to fade unnoticed into the background. No longer. After the crash of an American Airlines DC-10 on Memorial Day weekend, investigators called attention to the disturbing possibility that cracks in the wing engine mounts could have been put there when mechanics routinely overhauled the engine.

Ever since the crash, air travelers have been worried, as never before, about the quality of aircraft-mechanic training. The fact is that airplane mechanics must meet federal license requirements that are in some ways tougher than those...

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