Poverty: And Now, Judicare

"Laws grind the poor," observed Oliver Goldsmith in the 18th century, and little has happened since then to alter that unhappy condition. To most impoverished Americans, the law's personification is a landlord brandishing an eviction notice, a creditor repossessing furniture, a social worker cutting off welfare payments. Nonetheless, argues Anti-Poverty Czar Sargent Shriver, the law can and should be made to protect the poor. To this end, Shriver, a Yale-educated lawyer, has been zealously promoting a pioneering program to expand legal aid to the needy.

Last week Shriver announced that the program was being more than...

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