Essay: THE ARTS & USES OF PUBLIC RELATIONS

AMIONG many Polynesian tribes, the chief never utters a word in public: the speaking is done for him by a "talking chief" who is expert in the history of the tribe. The U.S. has adopted a similar custom on a grand scale. Here the talking chiefs are called public relations men.

They may not do the actual talking, but they advise and prompt and often write the script. They are employed by the President and his Cabinet, corporation executives and union bosses, university heads and foundation directors. They help banks seem less coldly businesslike,...

Want the full story?

Subscribe Now

Subscribe
Subscribe

Get TIME the way you want it

  • One Week Digital Pass — $4.99
  • Monthly Pay-As-You-Go DIGITAL ACCESS$2.99
  • One Year ALL ACCESSJust $30!   Best Deal!
    Print Magazine + Digital Edition + Subscriber-only Content on TIME.com

Learn more about the benefits of being a TIME subscriber

If you are already a subscriber sign up — registration is free!