Medicine: Pity the Patients

The worried New York State Senator from Queens let his beard grow for a day. Governor Thomas E. Dewey got a phone call from a coin booth. A mouse jumped out of a sawdust box. Finally the cleanup of Creedmoor State Hospital for mental patients in Queens, N.Y. got under way.

It was March, and high time—an epidemic of amebic dysentery, a filth-borne disease usually transmitted from excreta to the mouth, had plagued Creedmoor's inmates for three years. Six had died by the end of 1942 without action by the hospital's superintendent, Dr. George W....

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