The Nation: The Senate Rebels Against Foreing Aid

THE notion that the U.S. had finally achieved maturity in a confident and realistic appraisal of its role in world affairs was badly damaged last week. Out of the Viet Nam trauma, the nation, it was assumed, had learned the limitations of its power. The Nixon Doctrine sensibly equated goals with means, pledging economic and military aid—but not automatic U.S. military involvement—to those countries whose stability appeared vital to peace and to the basic interests of the U.S. President Nixon's personal ventures in summitry via Peking and Moscow were clearly an overdue recognition...

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