Yugoslavia: Staying in Power Without Turning Grey

If the deposed Nikita Khrushchev loomed over the outspoken Supreme Soviet meeting in Moscow, his lingering influence was felt even more strongly at the Yugoslav Communist Party Congress in Belgrade, where things were relatively frank too.

Addressing Yugoslav Communist delegates, as well as emissaries from most non-Peking parties abroad, Marshal Josip Broz Tito praised Nikita by name for his destalinization, his promotion of "freedom of expression," and for improving Soviet-Yugoslav relations. This part of Tito's speech never saw the light of day in Russia—frankness can go only so far.

Western reporters in Belgrade were surprised to be admitted to all sessions of...

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