Science: 72 Inches of Bubbles

At Berkeley, Calif., one of the world's biggest, most complex and most dangerous scientific instruments was ready for full operation for the first time. Its name was a tongue twister: the liquid hydrogen bubble chamber, designed and built by the University of California's Radiation Laboratory. In the next week or so, a beam of antiprotons from Berkeley's great 6 billion-volt Bevatron will pass through a pipe 200 ft. long, enter an odd-looking building and strike into a glass-topped metal bathtub containing 150 gal. of liquid hydrogen. As the antiprotons travel through the liquid,...

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