Art: AMERICANS AT BRUSSELS:

Soft Sell, Range & Controversy

FOR the thousands who eddy each day through the 470-acre exhibit-packed Brussels World's Fair, the U.S. Pavilion, with its open plaza, reflecting pool and splashing fountains, has become a star attraction. But what is inside the lofty, translucent drum designed by Architect Edward D. Stone (TIME, Cover, March 31) has become the subject of a running controversy, at home and abroad. Main reason is that the U.S., setting out to give its interpretation of a new humanism tailored to fit the Atomic Age, decided it could win more friends by using the soft sell. The result has...