Letters, Jun. 11, 1956

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Gelnhausen, Germany

Sir:

May one point out that the two executed Cypriots were criminals, not heroes? It is high time America tried to understand the other side of the picture instead of lending her support to murder and terrorism, which at other times she professes to abhor.

BERYL M. GOLDSMITH

Wembley, England

Sir:

The solution you present in the May 21 issue is a satisfactory one under the circumstances, which will preserve the Western unity as well as the interests of Great Britain and the rightful demands of the Cypriot people for self-determination. It would be wise for the American Government to support your recommendations.

(REV.) DEMETRIOS J. CONSTANTELOS

St. Demetrios Greek Orthodox Church

Perth Amboy, N.J.

The Evil Eye

Sir:

It is with extreme disappointment that I read the May 21 article on television reporters. We admit that in our field, just as in newspapering, we have reporters who are discourteous and who may sometimes ask ridiculous questions. These are not monopolies of either medium; happily, they are in the minority among both TV and newspaper reporters.

HAROLD BAKER

President

Radio-Television News Directors Association

Nashville

Sir:

Having worked in all three news media (newspapers, TV and radio), I'll admit there's a lot to what you say. However, your article was restricted to incidents in just two areas, Chicago and Los Angeles, and you place the blame on the TV reporters themselves. Many times the TV "reporter" is nothing more than an extra announcer. He's probably a good announcer, but, for some vague reason, many TV stations expect the same man that sells cars, furniture and diaper services to do a job he cares very little about. When experienced newsmen staff a TV newsroom, I don't think the questions will be "vapid."

DICK RICHMOND

WRIT Milwaukee

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