Letters, Jun. 11, 1956

  • Share
  • Read Later

(2 of 3)

Enjoyed your May 28 story on Robin Roberts; there's one pitcher that's worth a thousand words.

JEAN VENTURINI

Cincinnati

Sir:

When I saw how Henry Koerner had wrecked my favorite player, I nearly had convulsions. Please don't do it again.

JONATHAN SCOVILLE West Hartford, Conn.

Sir:

All Philadelphians know of the low esteem in which they are held by the New York press —which pleases us no end. But you can't publish so-called portraits of our Robby on your cover and say such nasty things about our Phillies and their fans without getting a few brickbats in return.

EDYTHE KINGSLEY BEACH

Philadelphia

Sir:

I am delighted to have another Koerner-covered TIME. Besides admiring Koerner and Shahn, I think it enhances the American scene to have their art outside as well as inside your magazine. Then too, you make it possible to reverse the adage—and so to judge the book by its cover.

HAZEL OSBORN

Chicago

Behind Freud's Door

Sir:

After seeing my picture of Freud's historic analytic couch in TIME [April 23], I thought you might be interested in the story behind the series of pictures which I took of Freud and his apartment in Vienna in 1938. Shortly after the Anschluss in Austria I was approached by a good friend, Dr. August Aichhorn, a close collaborator of Freud's, to make a photographic record of Freud's apartment in order to make it possible to establish a Freud museum as soon as the storm had passed. Heavy ransom was paid to the Nazis for Freud's safe-conduct out of Austria and for the removal of all his belongings, and no time could be lost in starting the assignment.

I decided to work early in the morning, taking into consideration Freud's daily routine. One day Freud changed his schedule and ran into me. He appeared alert and vivacious, much younger than his 82 years. I had to leave Austria in a hurry shortly thereafter, and I left the pictures and negatives with Dr. Aichhorn. After Aichhorn's death my negatives were sent to Miss Anna Freud, who kept them and handed them back to me in 1954 in London.

EDMUND ENGELMAN

Elmhurst, N.Y.

For Reader Engelman's picture of Freud's apartment door in Vienna, see cut.—ED.

Final Returns

Sir:

Is there some sleight of hand in your report on the Indiana primary election results (May 21)? You say that Vanderburgh

County, "which has backed every presidential winner since 1896, gave Ike 15,129, the Keef 12,550." Yet I read in the papers that, in final returns in Vanderburgh County, 22,007 people chose Democratic ballots, and 17,752 chose Republican ballots.

WARREN PARKER

New York City

Vanderburgh County's (and Indiana's) choice for President was Dwight Eisenhower. A final canvass in Vanderburgh County, completed five days after TIME went to press, gave Ike 15,223 votes, Kefauver 12,572. The figure on "Democratic ballots" refers to the total votes cast in a congressional race involving local issues and seven candidates; many voters failed to indicate presidential choices.—ED.

Storm over Cyprus

Sir:

Your May 21 article concerning the Cypriot-British dispute was magnificent. Karaolis and Demetriou are heroes in the eyes of all freedom loving people of the world.

NICHOLAS HYDOS

  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3