Science: Flight of a Shadow

Never did a solar eclipse get as much attention as the one of last week. It could be seen—at least partially and weather permitting—by about one-third of the earth's population. Never was an eclipse so thoroughly observed.

At Minneapolis and St. Paul, near the start of the eclipse, the sun rose in a clear sky with a small bite of its bright disk already nibbled away by the moon. Early risers, on roofs or in parks, had a perfect view of totality, with all the weird effects that they had been reading about. But the scientists were taking no chances. One group,...

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