The Press: Watered-Down Pulitzers?

The Atlanta Constitution, which won a Pulitzer Prize in 1931 for exposing municipal graft, last week teed off on the Pulitzer-Prize committee for this year's awards. With a hard look at the six 1950 awards for international reporting and the two for meritorious public service by newspapers (TIME, May 14), Editor Ralph McGill wrote: ". . . There comes the disquieting feeling that the Pulitzer awards are, in some degree, at least, annually coming to have less & less meaning . . .

"In [some] fields the committee followed the line of least resistance by splitting up the prizes into many sections....

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