THE PRESIDENCY,LABOR: Soft Pedal

THE PRESIDENCY

Unlike Franklin Roosevelt, who liked to needle Republicans with provocative statements during their conventions, Harry Truman soft-pedaled politics last week. He seemed to have no interest in what was being said about him at Philadelphia; not until the second ballot did he turn on the television set in his office. Later, secluded in his study, he watched the convention's climax.

Before the convention, his political advisers had put Tom Dewey just behind Arthur Vandenberg in their rating of candidates hardest for Harry Truman to beat. With Earl Warren's nomination for Vice...

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