Science: Trivision

In the plushier Victorian parlors, the stereoscope had been a favorite gadget. Viewed through its wooden lorgnette-style holder, special, double photographs looked solidly three-dimensional, and entertained the young & old on dull Sunday afternoons. Last week the Navy announced that it was perfecting an improvement: a single photograph which appears three-dimensional without benefit of "viewer."

Objects looked at directly seem three-dimensional because each of the two human eyes sees a slightly different picture. The stereoscope, with its two pictures taken from different angles, copies this principle.

Six years ago the Navy picked up an idea which Inventor Douglas F. Winnek had been working...

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