KOREA: The Russians Came

For the first time in months, coal smoke drifted lazily over Seoul; the Russians had come at last to Korea's fuelless capital.

The 60-odd members of the delegation steamed in, in their own special train, to negotiate a coordinated administration of northern and southern Korea, as directed by the Big Three Foreign Ministers' Moscow Conference. The U.S. commander in Korea, grim-jawed Lieut. General John R. Hodge, was doubtless impressed by the Russians' three sleeping cars, five flatcars to carry their Lend-Lease limousines, a radio communications car. He was certainly impressed by the three cars of coal—the first, except for three...

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