Religion: The German Hitler Feared

The man whom Adolf Hitler dared not kill stood in the chancel of a little church in the Alpine village of Cortina d'Ampezzo, Italy. Only a few hours before, Pastor Martin Niem&2461ler, leader of Germany's Confessional Church—and one of Christianity's most effective anti-Nazi weapons—had been liberated by the U.S. Fifth Army. His first public act after eight years of imprisonment was to conduct a religious service, based on a text he had long since chosen for this moment:

Behold, the hour cometh, yea, is now come, that ye shall be scattered, every man to his own, and shall leave me alone: and...

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