Conservation: Keeping Tahoe Alive

To the Indians, Lake Tahoe meant "Big Water," a laconic understatement even for an Indian. Twenty-two miles long, twelve miles wide and one-third of a mile deep, Tahoe is the third largest alpine lake in the world (after the Peruvian-Bolivian Titicaca and Oregon's Crater Lake). Poured out over California, it would submerge the entire state in 14½ in. of water. Withal, Tahoe is a volcanic and glacial marvel, ringed for one-third of the year by snow-dazzling mountain tops. To Mark Twain, Tahoe was a "noble sheet of blue water." In the past decade, it has faintly but frighteningly threatened to...

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