Customs: The Sunday Brunch

LUNCHEON OR LUNCH BUT NOT BRUNCH! advised Emily Post. It took her only ten lines to dismiss the custom as a "single-headed, double-bodied deformity 'standees' of at a lunch language" that counter but not "suggests the beauty of hospitable living." That was in the 1950 edition of Etiquette. The current edition takes a different view of brunch, calls it "a pleasant sort of informal, even casual entertaining," offers tips on how to dress and what to serve. Moving with the times, the post-Post posture simply acknowledges that going out to Sunday brunch with family or friends has become very...

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