Foreign Relations: The Morning After

After the heady experience came headachy doubts and morning-after questions.

Hardly had Nikita Khrushchev promised to back away from his Cuba missiles adventure than the Kennedy Administration started warning journalists not to get too encouraged, not to use words like "capitulation," not to assume that the "hard line" was applicable to all fronts of the cold war.

From that moment on, some of the momentum seemed to go out of the U.S.'s new drive against Soviet Communism and Castro's Cuba.

The Angry Man. Khrushchev had not only agreed to dismantle his missiles and...

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