Medicine: Nerves of War

Basically, it isn't so much the heat of battle that makes a soldier break down and become psychoneurotic; it's a combination of past woes and the sympathy he knows he'll get behind the lines. Later, pensions seem to help make the neuroses last longer. So says Dr. Lothar B. Kalinowsky, research psychiatrist at Columbia University's College of Physicians & Surgeons, after a careful study of the war neuroses in various armies.

The German army was a good laboratory example, Dr. Kalinowsky told the annual convention of the American Psychiatric Association in Detroit last...