Letters, Aug. 10, 1959

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Road to Success

SIR:

TIME HAS DONE A TREMENDOUS SERVICE TO CANCER CONTROL IN ITS JULY 27 STORY ON HELLER AND THE NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE. PUBLIC UNDERSTANDING OF CANCER AND ITS PROBLEMS WILL HASTEN SUCCESS.

CHARLES C. HANSBURY

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY

NEW JERSEY DIVISION

NEWARK

A Dip in Cold Water

Sir:

I feel, in justice to Westminster school, that I should reveal the unpalatable truth that [Britain's Labor Party leader] Mr. Hugh Gaitskell was educated at Winchester College, and not at Westminster, as stated in your issue of July 20.

The boys at Winchester have from time immemorial been obliged to take a dip in a tubful of cold water before breakfast—hangers-back being dunked forcibly. Ever since Mr. Gaitskell's rise to notoriety, there has been a rumor prevalent at his old school that it was his treatment in that institution which led to his subsequent quaint opinions about capitalists and, inter alia, the education of their progeny.

D. F. ROBSON

London

The Card Mart

Sir:

Thanks for a great story on the Washington Senators' "Awesome Foursome," the "Killers' Row" of current baseball [July 20]. The diehard fans of this team finally have something to keep their hopes alive. Even Casey Stengel takes cover when the Senators arrive.

CHET ANDERSON

Hyattsville, Md.

Sir:

In Sport you have a quote, "I'll give 20 [baseball cards] for one of Killebrew" and "twenty, too" for Allison, "but nobody's got any."

I have Allisons about five times and Killebrew once. Mantle is worth five cards at the most, unless he hits 60.

BRIAN HARTSHORN (AGE 13)

Hollis, N.Y.

Sir:

I saw your story about baseball cards and the guy in Washington who will give 20 for a Bob Allison. Here is my Bob Allison, so please have him send me 20 cards, including a Mickey Mantle. P.S.: No doubles.

RUSTY MCKELLAR (AGE 9)

Pacific Palisades, Calif.

Twenty baseball cards, including a Mickey Mantle, are on their way to Reader McKellar (no doubles).—ED.

The Persuader

Sir:

In your issue of July 13, you inferred that I was engaging in a revolt against the leadership of Lyndon Johnson. That was not how I felt about it. He is the ablest majority leader in the history of the Senate. Don't blame me because I tried to persuade Johnson to do things my way. He persuades me to do them his way often enough.

RUSSELL LONG

United States Senate Washington

Men of Steel

Sir:

Congratulations on your fine cover article on Roger Blough of U.S. Steel [July 20]. It focuses attention on labor's power, organization and relative invulnerability to corporate restrictions, as compared to business.

J. H. CLARK

New York City

Sir:

Ten years ago most U.S. manufacturers could afford to export on a C.I.F. (cash-in-fist) basis. But today the manufacturer who wants export business does give credit terms abroad. One thing would aid U.S. manufacturers in export selling—having our Government backing them up on extended credit terms abroad, as do West Germany and the United Kingdom for their manufacturers.

RICHARD G. LURIE

Editor

American Exporter

New York City

Sir:

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