FOREIGN RELATIONS: The Basic Assets

This week, in simple, ringing, memorable sentences, U.S. Secretary of State John Foster Dulles laid out the nation's position in the world as of fall, 1955.

Because the Soviet Union's record is so sullied, Dulles told the American Legion's annual convention in Miami that it is impossible to tell whether the "spirit of Geneva" marks a genuine change of Communist purpose or whether it is a Communist maneuver.

As a result, the U.S. must follow a policy that will not rebuff a real change for the better, but will not expose the nation to mortal danger. "Fortunately," said the Secretary of State,...

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