National Affairs: POLITICS WITHOUT PATRONAGE

A Noble Achievement Brings New Problems of Discipline

ON the morning of Nov. 5, 1952, the Republican politicians came down out of the hills and gazed hungrily about them in the Valley of Plenty from which Ike Eisenhower had just driven the Democrats. After 20 years, the federal patronage belonged to the G.O.P. once again. Federal payrolls were larger than any Republican had ever presided over—2,500,000 people holding down civilian jobs in Washington, across the land, and all around the world. Instantly, district, county and state bosses turned expectantly toward those traditional dispensers of federal patronage, the national committeemen, the Congressmen and...

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