U.S. At War: The No-Strike Pledge

This week President Roosevelt ordered the Army to seize a small Minneapolis brassworks because the C.I.O. workers had called a "work stoppage," labor's wartime euphemism for a strike.

This was the 21st time in the war that the President had been forced to seize a war-essential plant because of labor trouble. Strikes breaking out again in the coal fields of Pennsylvania and West Vir ginia seemed about to swell the list : with 33 mines already being operated by the Government, new walkouts last week left 30 mines and 12,000 miners idle and —presumably — waiting for the Army to come in.

The...

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