Science: Plant Pills

Plants have nothing to do but eat and grow, yet to them has been given a synthetic food substitute. A can of water, a food pill, and care will make roses bloom at Christmas if started in September. The cuttings are placed in the water, the pill added, the water kept up to the mark, and in a few weeks rootlets appear; in a few months, roses. Sweetpeas, phlox, snapdragons, asters, other annuals respond to slightly different treatment.

The seed is planted on a thin slice of cork floating in the solution; the floats are kept damp until tiny rootlets come crawling...

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