Transport: Victims & Winners

During the qualifying tests for a limited-displacement race, Pilot Lee Miles was doing about 200 m. p. h. 50 yd. from the ground. Suddenly his wing folded. Hurtling end over end, the fuselage pitched in a long arc into a clump of trees. When witnesses got there, Pilot Miles, who was officially declared the U. S. racing champion of 1934, was dead.

There were other hair-raising occurrences at the 17th annual National Air Races at Cleveland last week, but more newsworthy and of more practical value to aviation were two great races—the one named after...

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