National Affairs: 8 Points v. 14

When President Roosevelt and Prime Minister Churchill set down in black & white the peace aims that they had in common, there was no doubt that they had a historical precedent in mind.

In 1918's beginning, when the Allies were in despair, Woodrow Wilson published his famed Fourteen Points. Their impact was immediate, enormous, beyond all hopes. Little peoples of Central Europe scrambled for what they now saw clearly, for the first time, were their rights: self-determination of government, open covenants, freedom of the seas, removal of trade barriers, a general association of nations on principles of good will, reduction of armaments....

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