Education: Speaker-Upper

I am in earnest—I will not equivocate—I will not excuse—I will not retreat a single inch—and I will be heard!

Thus spoke William LloydGarrison at a crisis in U. S. affairs (slavery) in 1831. Last week a Manhattan publicity man, dark, voluble little Edward L. Bernays, emulated Garrison as loudly as radio, printing presses and modern advertising permitted—which was plenty loud.

Edward Bernays, a nephew of Sigmund Freud, hates to be called a press agent. He had raised his voice for democracy before, as a member of the U. S. Committee on Public Information (propaganda) in World War I. Since then he...

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