CRIME: Cutthroat Pardoned

After 20 years the name of Leo Frank still makes news in Georgia and beyond. A slender young Brooklyn Jew with a Cornell degree. Frank went South, married an Atlanta girl, became superintendent of an Atlanta pencil factory. In April 1913, a 14-year-old worker named Mary Phagan was found violently murdered in the factory's basement. Two days later Frank was arrested for the crime, tried and convicted largely on the testimony of a Negro employed as a sweeper in the factory. New York City Jews rushed to Frank's defense, raised funds to appeal...

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