THE CONGRESS: 30-Man Rule

Entering the House of Representatives two years ago with dewy eyes, Arizona's Democrat Stewart L. Udall, 34, a Tucson lawyer, quickly had the mist wiped away. Udall found himself on the Education and Labor Committee, discovered that the important 30-man committee functioned only when and however its aging conservative chairman, Graham Arthur Barden of North Carolina, willed. Working under an archaic two-sentence set of rules, i.e., meetings at the chairman's, call, formation of subcommittees only at the chairman's pleasure, the committee in Udall's first two years churned only ten important proposals...

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