Inside the Maritime Boundary Talks

EAST TIMOR:
International law says that when two states are less than 400 nautical miles (750 km) apart, the maritime boundary should be the line of equidistance.

AUSTRALIA:
That's wrong, because this area is unique. The 1958 U.N. Convention on the Continental Shelf is the guiding principle. The sea bed in the Timor Sea has a huge steep cleft called the Timor Trough - 550 nautical miles long, 40 n. mi. wide and as deep as 3,000 m. The two countries sit on different shelves.

EAST TIMOR:
That's a poor argument. If you...

Want the full story?

Subscribe Now

Subscribe
Subscribe

Get TIME the way you want it

  • One Week Digital Pass — $4.99
  • Monthly Pay-As-You-Go DIGITAL ACCESS$2.99
  • One Year ALL ACCESSJust $30!   Best Deal!
    Print Magazine + Digital Edition + Subscriber-only Content on TIME.com

Learn more about the benefits of being a TIME subscriber

If you are already a subscriber sign up — registration is free!