Between the Lines By Mark Halperin

  • Share
  • Read Later

(2 of 2)

Late 1800s

Sikhs begin their first sustained migration from India to the West Coast of the U.S.

1965

U.S. Congress passes major immigration reform, opening the door to a new wave of Asian arrivals.

1980s and early '90s

Anti-Sikh riots in New Delhi, Sikh uprisings in the Indian state of Punjab and police violence against Sikhs spur thousands to immigrate to the U.S.

2001

Four days after al-Qaeda's attacks on 9/11, Balbir Singh Sodhi is shot in Arizona, becoming the first Sikh murdered after the Twin Towers fell. The U.S. Senate passes a resolution affirming and protecting the civil rights of Sikh Americans.

2004

The New York police department reinstates ex-employee Amric Singh Rathour, who was dismissed after refusing to remove his turban and shave his beard.

2007

A school bully cuts off a 15-year-old Sikh's unshorn hair in New York City.

2012

In February, a Michigan gurdwara is defaced with 9/11 graffiti. On Aug. 5, a gunman opens fire on a prayer service in Wisconsin, killing six.

Number of registered gurdwaras

[The following text appears within a map. Please see hardcopy or PDF for actual map.]

68

32

0 OR NO DATA

1--5

6--10

11--15

16+

SOURCE: THE SIKH COALITION

What Sikhs believe

There is one God, all humans are equal, and service, devotion, and morality lead to enlightenment

Prominent Sikhs in the U.S.

Ajay Banga

President and CEO of MasterCard and chairman of the U.S.-India Business Council

Alexi Grewal

First American man to win Olympic gold for road cycling, in 1984

Nikki Haley

Governor of South Carolina who was raised Sikh and now identifies as Methodist

  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. Next Page