Missing Man

MIKICA PETROVIC/AP

An infiltrated supporter holds up a small photo of Yugoslav President Vojislav Kostunica next to a protester's Milosevic poster at a demonstration outside Belgrade's central prison

Serb Prime Minister Zoran Djindjic is often quoted as saying that Slobodan Milosevic "belongs to the past." The authors of the new history textbook used in Serbia's elementary schools don't seem to agree: Milosevic is not even mentioned in the book, while the decade of war and ethnic cleansing that resulted in the breakup of the country is handled in just two paragraphs. How could such a crucial period in Yugoslav history be dispatched so summarily? And how could Milosevic, the era's main protagonist, be excised from the account?

According to Radoslav Petkovic, director of the Institute for Textbooks, the...

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