Signs of Progress

If you're a teacher with a deaf student in your class, or if you have a deaf friend or work colleague, you'll know that communication between the hearing and nonhearing can sometimes be a bit tricky. Learning the basics of sign language is a good start, but there will always be words you don't know. If you're stuck on the sign for lunch, you could consult a language textbook, but piecing together static signs on the page isn't very efficient.

To help keep the conversation flowing, the University of Bristol's Centre for Deaf Studies in England has developed...

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